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“Delivered us” or “Delivers us” in 1 Thessalonians 1:10?

"And to wait for his Son from heaven, whom he raised from the dead, even Jesus, which delivered us from the wrath to come." (1 Thessalonians 1:10, KJV)

Some have remarked that the KJV erroneously translates the present participle "τον ρυομενον (ton rhuomenon)" as the English past tense "delivered" instead of the English present tense "delivers".  Literally, the Greek says, "...whom he raised from the dead, even Jesus, which [or "the one"] delivering us from the wrath to come."  The difficulty with present participles is that the "present-ness" of it might be in regards to the ongoing nature of the result of the action rather than the timing of the action itself.  The present participle "ρυομενον" here indicates action which started in the past of which the result continues in the present.  So in a sense, the verb covers action in the past.  The same grammar is seen in Ephesians 2:15 where it says, "Having abolished in his flesh the enmity, even the law of commandments contained in ordinances; for to make in himself of twain one new man, so making peace;"  In Ephesians 2:15, the word "ποιων (poion)" is a present participle, and it indicates the reconciling work of Jesus Christ "making peace" - an action which occurred in the past with a result that continues in the present.  Likewise, Jesus' deliverance from future wrath in 1 Thessalonians 1:10 is a past action (commenced when Jesus proclaimed "It is finished"(John 19:30)) with a result that continues in the present.